Publicity



Comedy Movies - Dave Barry's Complete Guide To Guys The Movie

Dave Barry, John Cleese, Christina Moore
Lochlyn Munro, Khalil Kain
Directed by Jeff Arch
VVS Films 2006
83 minutes

Dave Barry's Complete Guide To Guys The Movie is an absolutely hilarious dead-on comedy movie now available on DVD. Just this close to a real documentary, it is really a mockumentary about what it is to be a guy. This is an easy to watch, very entertaining comedy that comes as close to a perfect book-to-screen adaptation as you will ever get. And, as Dan Marino points out in the credits, this comedy is just the right length.

Dave Barry's Complete Guide To Guys The Movie presents itself as a series of chapters hosted by Miami columnist and humor book writer Dave Barry. He explores the history of mankind with a few asides devoted to womankind such as when they came up with "the stare". Chapters include such profound topics as Guys vs. Men, Guy Violence, Guys in the Workplace, Guy Feelings, Guys In Love, and, something that no woman will ever understand even if she watches this great comedy: Guys and the public restroom.

Dave Barry, who always wears the same exact shirt throughout the movie in a great guy gesture, is a very genial host who sets up various situations for Lochlyn Munro as Roger the boyfriend and Christina Moore as Elaine the girlfriend. They are assisted in their various recreations of important guy moments by a few other couples such as Gene and Kelly (Khalil Kain and Megan Ward).

A great joy to watch in this comedy DVD is John Cleese as a series of real genuine scientific experts. Director Jeff Arch really knew how to use this great comedian to his fullest potential and Cleese is great fun to watch here.

Dave Barry's Complete Guide To Guy The Movie is the kind of comedy DVD that proves men have more of a sense of humor than women: there was nary a cry from any men's group after the women in this movie compared med to a big stupid dog or a tapeworm and the latter came out better. If men thought about it for a while and were sensitive they would probably offended by some of the comments the women make about them but, hey, we're not so this is a really great comedy.

Source



Dave Barry Says Acting Career Is Over

Author: BRENDAN HOWARD
bhoward@questex.com
Posted: April 26, 2006

When humorist Dave Barry — author of such works as “My Teenage Son’s Goal in Life Is to Make Me Feel 3,500 Years Old” and Other Thoughts on Parenting From Dave Barry and “The Greatest Invention in the History of Mankind Is Beer” and Other Manly Insights From Dave Barry — met filmmaker Jeff Arch over “rum-based Hawaiian drinks” in Maui, Barry was surprised to learn that Arch wanted to make a movie of his book.

This book wasn’t like Barry’s 1999 novel Big Trouble, which was made into a 2001 film starring Tim Allen.

“The Complete Guide to Guys doesn’t have a plot,” Barry said. “But [Arch] told me, ‘No, no, I’ve had this vision of vignettes, and a couple will sort of tie it together.”

Barry liked Arch, so he went with it. The result is Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys (DVD $26.98, VHS rental), streeting May 30 (prebook May 8) from Monarch Home Video.

The movie is based on Barry’s ruminations on men’s obsession with tools, sports and avoiding other men in the restroom, and created a history of men from prehistory to the present. Cameos by former Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino and Monty Pythoner John Cleese joined on-screen couple Lochlyn Munro and Christina Moore. Then there was the next surprise: acting.

“[Arch] says, ‘You’ll be in it,’” Barry said. “Oh, I thought I’d be the narrator, introduce a scene or two. I didn’t realize I was going to be Bruce Willis in Die Hard.”

But Barry agreed to the challenge — one he’s not looking to duplicate.

Every day of shooting would always start out so well for Barry.

“First, they want you to say the exact words and be in the perfect place,” he said. “I’m used to writing — delete this, change that, and you’re done. Here, there are 300 people looking at you.

“Inevitably, I’d have learned my lines. I’d be driving to wherever the set was, I’d play my lines, 25 to 30 words, I’d have it nailed. On set, my brain would go [singing], ‘My baby does it … ’”

The other problem was those scenes with Cleese.

“Cleese is very funny,” he said. “It turns out you’re not allowed to laugh when you’re in the scene. The first four or five takes, I’d laugh. [Jeff] would put less and less of me in the shot.”

Barry’s family got in on the act, too. Wife and Miami Herald sports writer Michelle Kaufman played Barry’s wife. Daughter Sophie’s work as a cavegirl got cut, Barry said, but she got to keep the costume and use it for Halloween.

Now that the film premiered at the Santa Barbara Film Festival and is on its way to DVD, it’s been back to writing for Barry. His latest book hit in January: Dave Barry’s Money Secrets — Like, Why Is There a Giant Eyeball on the Dollar?

“My acting career is over,” he said. “I’m kind of messing with a screenplay with an old friend of mine, but can we honestly say there isn’t a person messing with a screenplay?”




LABRADOR MEDIA GROUP AND TAHOE-RENO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP

Santa Barbara, California: Labrador Media Group, LLC today announced a strategic partnership between its Labrador Releasing Division and the Tahoe-Reno International Film Festival (T-RIFF). Labrador will work with the independent filmmakers participating in T-RIFF’s August film festival whose films receive the top 5 awards to secure distribution for their films. Labrador’s mission in its partnership with T-RIFF is to provide those filmmakers the opportunity to realize profits through advantageous distribution arrangements; a goal that heretofore has been a difficult one for filmmakers to achieve.

Labrador Releasing has recently expanded its scope from developing and releasing only its own motion picture projects to include carefully selected outside projects. Labrador has secured unique and preferred relationships with traditional domestic and international distributors as well as with newer distribution outlets utilizing the latest state of the art technologies to provide film content through internet purchase, pay per view, personal video devices and other formats.

Labrador Media Group, headquartered in Santa Barbara, California was formed by film veterans David Shor and Jeff Arch after their success with another company they jointly formed, Labrador Pictures. Labrador Pictures recently produced the feature film “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys”, which has secured worldwide distribution arrangements in both theatrical and broadcast/ home video areas, and is being released nationwide by Monarch Home Video on May 30, 2006.

The Tahoe-Reno International Film Festival is headquartered in Incline Village, Nevada in a $6.7 million facility funded by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation and operated by The Parasol Community Foundation. T-RIFF is one of eleven non-profit organizations chosen to be housed in this model collaborative project, the first of its kind in the nation. Operating since 1999, T-RIFF, besides its annual film festival, has produced approximately 150 educational events in the literary and multimedia arts. T-RIFF holds ongoing film screenings, short film productions, TV production workshops, screenwriting courses, script/film competitions, and owns and operates Lake Tahoe Public Television. T-RIFF’s annual film festival will be held this year on August 23-27.





Labrador Pictures announces formation of Labrador Releasing, distributes first title

Labrador Pictures has announced the formation of a new division and the release of its first title “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys,” based on Barry’s best-selling book. The movie is available through the company’s website http://www.guidetoguys.com, and also through www.cusomflix.com, and www.amazon.com. Additional retail and rental outlets will be announced as deals are finalized.

Santa Barbara, California 12/29/05: Labrador Pictures has announced the formation of a new division and the release of its first title “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys,” based on Barry’s best-selling book. The movie is available through the company’s website http://www.guidetoguys.com, and also through www.cusomflix.com, and www.amazon.com. Additional retail and rental outlets will be announced as deals are finalized.

Shot in Miami and Santa Barbara, the movie stars humorist Dave Barry as himself, joined by John Cleese, Dan Marino, and Carlos Ponce, in a thoroughly Barry-like attempt to explain key facets of Guy Behavior. Added to the mix are Lochlyn Munro and Christina Moore as an archetypical couple who, along with best friends Megan Ward and Khalil Kain, go all the way back to the Dawn of Guys, looking for answers that frankly just aren’t there.

Labrador’s distribution model breaks new ground, just as their development and production model did. Instead of the typical business model for a production company, Labrador was organized as a limited liability stock corporation, where investors buy shares in the company as opposed to one movie project in particular. As Labrador’s Managing Partner and the movie’s Executive Producer David Shor explains, “Investors are scared to death of putting money into movies – and for good reason. The key factor for us was that we went to people who invest very traditionally, and offered them a company with a structure they recognized, whose accountability to the stockholders was no different than IBM or GE. Unlike every horror story they might have heard, we could assure them that once we turn a profit, their money isn’t going to disappear into the ether of creative accounting. And that when the first film begets a second and a third, they share in those successes too, whether they put more money in or not.”

When it came to releasing the film, this same corporate responsibility to its stockholders led Labrador to expand into distribution. “All the models out there featured a standard distribution company getting upwards of 75% of the revenue of a film, when their investment in it might have been a relatively modest sum used for marketing, once the film was finished and most of the risk had been removed,” Shor says. “An arrangement like that, even with a successful film, could sink the company that made it, while the distributor is doing just fine. There was no way I could face our stockholders and tell them this was what we had done. I’d much rather tell them that we’re going to just work a little harder to get them a real return on their money.”

“Basically, we’d be paying ( the distributors ) to use their pipeline,” added co-founder Jeff Arch, who also wrote and directed the film. “Not that an established distributor’s pipeline is not a valuable thing – but it just seemed to be too high a price to pay. I was never good at math, but I get the difference between having to sell 200,000 copies to break even, and having to sell almost a million. So we decided to build our own pipeline.”

Labrador’s release pattern is also unconventional: DVD’s first, followed by TV and then selected theaters for limited engagements. Also, foreign territories were sold before domestic. “We know that sounds backwards,” says Shor. “But the standard model was created before the internet, before movie tickets cost what they do, before people could watch a movie at home on systems that often compete with the ones in theaters – without parking their cars and paying another small fortune for popcorn and a drink.”

“When the time comes, we’ll open in theaters in places where we’re already strong,” Shor adds. “We’ll advertise to a fan base that knows who we are, and knows they’re going to have a good time with other people who have also seen the movie, only now they get the group experience. They’ll know it’s worth their time and money before they leave the house.”

“Also, doing it this way gives us the same quality control over the marketing and distribution that we had with the movie itself,” Arch says. “Nobody can force an idea on us that we don’t like, or think is best for the product. We’re not going to lose interest, and we’re not going to let go until we can show a good profit and share our success with our investors. And after that? We do it again. With our own movies, and down the road with other independents – anyone with a product we can market, and who’d rather make money than lose it.”

http://www.webwire.com




FILM EXECUTIVE TO HEAD UP TAHOE/RENO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

February 27, 2006 – Incline Village, Nevada --- The Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival (T-RIFF) today announced that David Shor, managing director of Labrador Media Group and Labrador Pictures of Santa Barbara, California has become president of its board of directors. The Festival will be held Aug. 23-27, 2006 in Lake Tahoe.

In announcing the appointment of Shor, Katrina Wilson, founder and executive director of the festival said, “It’s no secret that the Festival was a huge hit last season, it was voted by the Lake Tahoe community as ‘Most Outstanding Community Service Organization in 2005’ out of hundreds of candidates. We grew 500% in the last year alone, and we needed a President who could bring a breadth of experience in strategic management, consulting and finance from the entertainment industry to the T-RIFF Board Room. David Shor not only fits the bill, his visionary ideas and hands on leadership approach energizes and inspires everyone around the table.”

During his 35-year career, Shor has advised, managed and produced events for a variety of clients from the entertainment industry; from major showroom acts in Las Vegas, to world-renowned "cirque" performers. He has also served as executive producer in event production for such acts as Santana, The Eagles, and Eric Clapton. Additionally, Shor has been involved in numerous motion picture projects as consultant, producer and executive producer, and to this end is a principal and managing partner of Labrador Media Group and Labrador Pictures. Labrador provides financing, production, development and distribution for filmmakers, writers and other artists. Shor’s partners in Labrador are Jeff Arch, an Academy Award nominee best known for writing “Sleepless In Seattle”, and Pulitzer Prize author and humorist Dave Barry.

Recently Shor served as producer and executive producer of Labrador Pictures recent release “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys,” which held its World Premiere at T-RIFF in 2005. Shor also serves on numerous corporate and not-for-profit boards and is a member of the Producer's Network of the Cannes Film Festival. Shor has raised and managed tens of millions of dollars on behalf of nonprofit organizations and his clients.

In a statement, Shor gave his experience of the festival from a guests’ perspective: “I attended the festival in 2005 with almost the entire cast and crew from our film. We all agreed that T-RIFF has enormous potential to rise as one of the world’s premiere festivals and to gain notoriety in the industry. The enthusiasm and professionalism of the T-RIFF staff, the quality of films, workshops and panels and the venue itself were awesome. I have attended and participated in film festivals all over the world, and T-RIFF has the elements to become one of the great ones. When I was asked to join the T-RIFF Board, and then to become its President, both decisions were easy for me”.

Shor further noted, “T-RIFF is celebrating its 7th year as a nonprofit organization. Their infrastructure is in place and they have everything needed to make a leap to the next level in 2006. With technology unique to the industry coming online this year and major sponsors coming on-board, a dedicated and passionate staff, a community of supportive people whose demographics are in the 99 percentile nationally, year-round offices in a multimillion-dollar center, and the fact that T-RIFF owns and operates its own TV station, T-RIFF is poised to become a major player among film festivals. Their location is key, not only because of the beauty of the area, but the close proximity to Hollywood and the influx of entertainment industry people buying second homes at Tahoe to vacation”.

“T-RIFF is an elite destination dedicated to raising awareness of film -- both as an art form and a catalyst for positive social change. Our eye is on the discovery of new talent and a diverse line-up of quality independent films. I am excited to be a part of the Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival and I am looking forward to serving as its President,” said Shor.

Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival
948 Incline Way – Incline Village, NV - 89451
www.t-riff.org 775-298-0018




Labrador Pictures Announces Formation Of Labrador Releasing, Distributes First Title

12/30/2005

Santa Barbara, California 12/29/05: Labrador Pictures has announced the formation of a new division and the release of its first title “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys,” based on Barry’s best-selling book. The movie is available through the company’s website http://www.guidetoguys.com, and also through www.cusomflix.com, and www.amazon.com. Additional retail and rental outlets will be announced as deals are finalized.

Shot in Miami and Santa Barbara, the movie stars humorist Dave Barry as himself, joined by John Cleese, Dan Marino, and Carlos Ponce, in a thoroughly Barry-like attempt to explain key facets of Guy Behavior. Added to the mix are Lochlyn Munro and Christina Moore as an archetypical couple who, along with best friends Megan Ward and Khalil Kain, go all the way back to the Dawn of Guys, looking for answers that frankly just aren’t there.

Labrador’s distribution model breaks new ground, just as their development and production model did. Instead of the typical business model for a production company, Labrador was organized as a limited liability stock corporation, where investors buy shares in the company as opposed to one movie project in particular. As Labrador’s Managing Partner and the movie’s Executive Producer David Shor explains, “Investors are scared to death of putting money into movies – and for good reason. The key factor for us was that we went to people who invest very traditionally, and offered them a company with a structure they recognized, whose accountability to the stockholders was no different than IBM or GE. Unlike every horror story they might have heard, we could assure them that once we turn a profit, their money isn’t going to disappear into the ether of creative accounting. And that when the first film begets a second and a third, they share in those successes too, whether they put more money in or not.”

When it came to releasing the film, this same corporate responsibility to its stockholders led Labrador to expand into distribution. “All the models out there featured a standard distribution company getting upwards of 75% of the revenue of a film, when their investment in it might have been a relatively modest sum used for marketing, once the film was finished and most of the risk had been removed,” Shor says. “An arrangement like that, even with a successful film, could sink the company that made it, while the distributor is doing just fine. There was no way I could face our stockholders and tell them this was what we had done. I’d much rather tell them that we’re going to just work a little harder to get them a real return on their money.”
“Basically, we’d be paying (the distributors) to use their pipeline,” added co-founder Jeff Arch, who also wrote and directed the film. “Not that an established distributor’s pipeline is not a valuable thing – but it just seemed to be too high a price to pay. I was never good at math, but I get the difference between having to sell 200,000 copies to break even, and having to sell almost a million. So we decided to build our own pipeline.”

Labrador’s release pattern is also unconventional: DVD’s first, followed by TV and then selected theaters for limited engagements. Also, foreign territories were sold before domestic. “We know that sounds backwards,” says Shor. “But the standard model was created before the internet, before movie tickets cost what they do, before people could watch a movie at home on systems that often compete with the ones in theaters – without parking their cars and paying another small fortune for popcorn and a drink.”

“When the time comes, we’ll open in theaters in places where we’re already strong,” Shor adds. “We’ll advertise to a fan base that knows who we are, and knows they’re going to have a good time with other people who have also seen the movie, only now they get the group experience. They’ll know it’s worth their time and money before they leave the house.”

“Also, doing it this way gives us the same quality control over the marketing and distribution that we had with the movie itself,” Arch says. “Nobody can force an idea on us that we don’t like, or think is best for the product. We’re not going to lose interest, and we’re not going to let go until we can show a good profit and share our success with our investors. And after that? We do it again. With our own movies, and down the road with other independents – anyone with a product we can market, and who’d rather make money than lose it.”

http://www.webwire.com



PRESS RELEASE

Contact:
Katrina Wilson, Executive Director
Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival (T-RIFF)
948 Incline Way Incline Village, NV 89451
(775) 298-0018
www.t-riff.org
tahoefilmfest@aol.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 24, 2006 – Incline Village, Nevada: The Tahoe-Reno International Film Festival (T-RIFF) today announced that David Shor, managing partner of Labrador Media Group and Labrador Pictures of Santa Barbara, California has become president of its’ board of directors. The Festival will be held Aug. 23-27, 2006 in Lake Tahoe.

In announcing the appointment of Shor, Katrina Wilson, founder and executive director of the festival said, “It’s no secret that the Festival was a huge hit last season, voted by the Lake Tahoe community as Most Outstanding Community Service Organization in 2005, out of hundreds of candidates. We grew 500% in the last year alone, and we needed a President who could bring a breadth of experience in strategic management, consulting and finance from the entertainment industry to the T-RIFF Board Room. David Shor not only fits the bill, his visionary ideas and hands-on leadership approach energizes and inspires everyone around the table.”

During his 35-year career, Shor has advised, managed and produced events for a variety of clients from the entertainment industry; from major showroom acts in Las Vegas, to world-renowned "cirque" performers. He has also served as executive producer in event production for such acts as Santana, The Eagles, and Eric Clapton. Additionally, Shor has been involved in numerous motion picture projects as consultant, producer and executive producer, and to this end is a principal and managing partner of Labrador Media Group and Labrador Pictures. Labrador provides financing, production, development and distribution for filmmakers, writers and other artists. Shor’s partners in Labrador are Jeff Arch, an Academy Award nominee best known for writing “Sleepless In Seattle,” and Pulitzer Prize author and humorist Dave Barry. Recently Shor served as producer and executive producer of Labrador Pictures recent release “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide To Guys,” which held its’ World Premiere at TRIFF in 2005. Shor also serves on numerous corporate and not-for-profit boards and is a member of the Producer's Network of the Cannes Film Festival. Shor has raised and managed tens of millions of dollars on behalf of nonprofit organizations and his clients.

In a statement, Shor gave his experience of the festival from a guests’ perspective: “I attended the festival in 2005 with almost the entire cast and crew from our film. We all agreed T-RIFF has enormous potential to rise as one of the world’s premiere festivals and to gain notoriety in the industry. The enthusiasm and professionalism of the T-RIFF staff, the quality of films, workshops and panels and the venue itself were awesome. I have attended and participated in film festivals all over the world, and TRIFF has the elements to become one of the great ones. When I was asked to join the TRIFF Board, and then to become its President, both decisions were easy for me”.

Shor further noted, “T-RIFF is celebrating its 7th year as a nonprofit organization. The Infrastructure is in place and they have everything needed to make a leap to the next level in 2006. With technology unique to the industry coming online this year and major sponsors coming on-board, a dedicated and passionate staff, a community of supportive people whose demographics are in the 99 percentile, year-round offices in a multimillion-dollar center, and the fact T-RIFF owns and operates its’ own TV station, T-RIFF is poised to become a major player among film festivals. Their location is key, not only because of the beauty of the area, but the close proximity to Hollywood and the influx of entertainment industry people buying second homes at Tahoe to vacation.”

“T-RIFF is an elite destination dedicated to raising awareness of film -- both as an art form and a catalyst for positive social change. Our eye is on the discovery of new talent and a diverse line-up of quality independent films. I am excited to be a part of the Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival and I am looking forward to serving as its president,” said Shor.







JEFF ARCH INTERVIEW

Jeff Arch's script for Sleepless in Seattle was an instant blockbuster and was nominated for two Academy Awards, including Best Original Screenplay, as well as for Golden Globes and BAFTAs.

Jeff’s other writing credits include: Iron Will, Sealed with a Kiss and Saving Milly. He most recently wrote and directed Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys, and his current projects include another film, Two Weeks in Chelsea, and a Broadway musical.

Jeff will be running a two-day advanced screenwriting event in London in April 2006.

Writersroom asked Jeff to tell us about his work and life as a writer.

Read the transcript of the interview here. (You will need Adobe Acrobat to view.)





Scribe - Helmer Jeff Arch debuts Dave Barry’s Guide to Guys at the Tahoe-Reno Film Festival to much laughter.
  
 It was a great pleasure to sit along the shore of north Lake Tahoe and watch the only U.S. festival screening of DAVE BARRY’S GUIDE TO GUYS. The pleasure was enhanced by the constant sound of laughter, snickers, giggles, and yes, some outright guffaws, from the opening scenes to the final credits. This is a good sign when watching a comedy, and the film did not disappoint. Written about guys for women the film captures the intricacies and foibles of being a guy and reveals them for the opposite sex. We predict G2G will become the date movie for anyone in a relationship!
  
 As the sun set prior to the screening Writer/Director/Producer Jeff Arch, Executive Producer David Shor and members of the cast and crew, kept the audience entertained with stories about the production and filming of G2G.
  
 Andrew Wilson bows The Wendell Baker Story at Tahoe-Reno Film Festival
  
 Also screening at T-RIFF was the Wilson brother’s latest offering THE WENDALL BAKER STORY. Like G2G THE WENDALL BAKER STORY offers a stellar cast, but unlike G2G, the screenplay stretched the audience’s ability to suspend disbelief a little too far. However, the sound track is killer and the acting and story worthy of your movie time and money.
  
 Thanks to the Tahoe-Reno Film Festival for bringing these and 70 other quality films to north Lake Tahoe. The inaugural festival was well run, fun and will become a major event for filmmakers. Mark your calendars for next year!





Forrest Hartman
RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL
8/27/2005 12:48 am

Editor’s note: The Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival is offering one-time showings of independent films that need distributors. Reno Gazette-Journal writer Forrest Hartman will review a few of them during the festival.

Dave Barry fans got a big dose of the humorist and author Thursday night as the Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival showed the latest — and probably final — cut of “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys.”

Based on Barry’s popular book, the film outlines the differences between men and women in mockumentary fashion with results ranging from cute to hilarious. Because Barry’s book is a series of comic shorts, writer-director Jeff Arch was charged with giving the project a plot. He did so by casting Barry as a journalist who interviews men and women about relationships, frequently breaking to offer his thoughts on the gender gap.

As he does, viewers are pushed through chapters of his book and often treated to examples of Barry’s theories as seen in two couples: Roger (Lochlyn Munro) and Elaine (Christina Moore); and Gene (Khalil Kain) and Kelly (Megan Ward). They act out a number of routines that should be familiar to anyone who’s been in a male-female relationship — for instance, a girlfriend demands to discuss relationship issues during a football playoff game.

Because Barry’s insight to relationships is bested only by his ability to put them in comic perspective, the film’s bits always ring true. But the on-screen interpretations often fall short. This can be explained, in part, because much of the material is weary. Barry has been writing about such things for decades, and anyone who knows his work has already envisioned many of the gags. It’s also worth noting that the relationships have been spawning comedy routines since the dawn of time.

Anyone who has seen the stage shows “Defending the Caveman” or “The Male Intellect: An Oxymoron” has tread the same ground, and the material is no stranger to the screen either. Television sitcoms from “Everybody Loves Raymond” to “Seinfeld” have banked heavily on this material.

And Woody Allen’s entire catalog owes much to the gender gap.

That doesn’t make “Guide to Guys” a bad film, but it does dampen its freshness.

Fortunately, the film shines in a number of scenes, including one where NFL Hall of Fame quarterback and sports broadcaster Dan Marino offers a play-by-play analysis of male bathroom habits. The movie also delivers an inspired vision of a guy’s perfect visit to the doctor, and a scientific explanation of the importance of being a sports fan.

Since, however, these bits are countered by tired routines about man’s reluctance to ask for directions and a woman’s constant need for emotional support, the picture often drags.

One thing the movie does establish is that Barry is compelling as an on-screen personality. Although hardly a traditional movie star, his quirky personality translates perfectly to the screen. Just watching him chew the scenery in tropical shirts and his slightly off-kilter haircut is a good time.

Also turning in an admirable performance is John Cleese, who plays a number of “British Experts,” capable of addressing everything from medical practices to social science. Cleese has keen timing and the routines Arch wrote are tailor-made to his strengths.

Arch, best known for writing “Sleepless in Seattle,” has the goods to make it as a director. Whether “Guide to Guys” earns a wide release or not, the movie is better than much of what hits the American multiplex.




Copyright © 2005 The Reno Gazette-Journal



Film Festival kicks off this week at Sand Harbor


Bonanza Photo - Emma Garrard Actor Andy Dick holds a falcon at the Celebrity Kick-Off for the Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival. The falcons promoted the film "Kiran over Mongolia" a story of a young man's quest to learn the art of hunting with eagles set in Mongolia that plays today. Dick stars in the film "Adcorp, Inc."

Jack Carrerow bonanza staff writer
jcarrerow@tahoebonanza.com

August 26, 2005

The Tahoe Reno International Film festival had its unveiling Wednesday afternoon as filmmakers gathered at Sand Harbor for a party that kicked off the four-day event.

The film fest will feature 80 film screenings at four venues, with workshops and panels by some of the participants.

Filmmakers like Jullian Adams, whose Civil War epic "Strike the Tent" is screening at Sand Harbor during the festival, said the film festival circuit is a necessary part for an independent filmmaker to get noticed.

"This is one of a few we'll bring the film to," Adams said. "We recently won an award in Ireland and the film is getting a good reception."

As for what he thinks of Lake Tahoe, "This place is beautiful and all the people have been very cordial," Adams said. "It'll be a lot of fun."

One of the main attention getters at the opening press conference and party were the falcons, brought to promote festival entry "Kiran Over Mongolia."

The crew spent three and a half months on location in Mongolia shooting "Kiran."

Living with their subjects in the very simple lifestyle of the nomads of Central Asia, the crew formed a deep bond with the local eagle hunters and their families.


Much of the film was shot on horseback in some of the most forbidding, yet austerely beautiful mountains in the world.


Director Joseph Spaid and his wife, Anna Halldorsdottir, are visiting Reno for the premiere. The film was financed by Spaid.

"It was either a house or movie," he said.

It had not been picked up yet for national release but is showing at several film festivals around the country.

Making the film had its problems, Spaid said.

"If you didn't bring equipment with you to Mongolia, you didn't have it," he said.

Halldorsdottir, from Iceland, appears at some of the showings of the film in an authentic embroidered Mongol robe.

She also was the sound designer.

Other attendees at the opening party included comedian Andy Dick, screenwriter Jeff Arch (Sleepless in Seattle) and David Shor, who along with Arch is presenting the film "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys."

"It's really great to be here and the excitement about screening the film and getting people's reaction would probably show on me better if it weren't for the altitude," Arch joked.

Screenings and workshops will be presented through the weekend. For tickets call (775) 298-0018 or go online at www.t-riff.org




More Tahoe Details
8/23/2005

Renowned vacation spot Lake Tahoe, NV draws filmmakers from around the world for the upcoming Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival running August 24- August 28th, 2005.

Showcasing this year’s best in independent short and feature films from the world over, festival goers will find chances to mingle with directors, filmmakers, celebrities, and fellow film lovers at parties and tributes. The festival will host five different venues at North and South Lake Tahoe, Reno, and Carson City from which to choose films. And so much more . . .

This year, the festival is thrilled to premiere “Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys”. Affectionately referred to as ‘G2G’, the film recently screened to rave reviews at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. It’s based on the book of the same title written by Pulitzer Prize winning humorist Dave Barry, screenplay adapted and directed by Jeff Arch, Academy Award nominated writer of “Sleepless in Seattle”.

"This is a coup for us," says festival Executive Director Katrina Wilson. "We’re excited to host the cast, crew, and executives and are looking forward to introducing them during the Celebrity Cast Reunion Party, which will be held in their honor on August 24th at Sand Harbor, Lake Tahoe."

The festival will hold a tribute to Hollywood icon Mickey Rooney, who will be in attendance to present his critically acclaimed off-Broadway production, “Let's Put on a Show” with his wife Jan Rooney -- a walk down memory lane through songs and stories. And as a bonus, festival attendees will get to see Mickey's latest film, “Strike the Tent”—one of 80 films chosen to be screened throughout the festival.

"We're excited to screen “The Wendall Baker Story” co-directed by actors Luke Wilson ("Old School," "The Royal Tenenbaums") and Andrew Wilson ("Charlie's Angel's 2," "Bottle Rocket"). The film stars Luke Wilson, Eva Mendes, Jacob Vargas, Seymour Cassel, Harry Dean Stanton, Kris Kristofferson, Owen Wilson and Eddie Griffin. The screenplay was written by Luke Wilson, and the film is produced by Mark Johnson ("Rain Man," "The Rookie," "The Notebook"), David Bushell ("Sling Blade," "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind"), and David Bergstein. Both David Bushell and Andrew Wilson will be in attendance to discuss their film and meet with festival attendees.

Another festival screening highlight is director Jim Thebaut’s explosive documentary, “Running Dry." A compelling exposé of the global water crisis narrated by award winning actress Jane Seymour. The film stands shoulder to shoulder with films from domestic and international locations that will provoke thought, bring laughter, draw tears, touch hearts, or simply make one smile.

And how can films do all that? The Tahoe/Reno International Film Festival will speak to that, as well; there’ll be a minimum of seven workshops and panels that promise to be fascinating. From a ‘Screenwriting Master Class’ to ‘Animation A to Z’, top Hollywood talent will offer up Emmy-winning and Academy Award nominated perspectives into the world of film.

“We’ve hand-picked some of the industry’s most seasoned veterans to lead our education programs,” says Wilson. Director Tod Robinson will inspire attendees with knowledge gleaned during his career and make important points about filmmaking with never before seen clips of the newest John Travolta film “Lonely Hearts.”

Jeff Arch, “Sleepless in Seattle” and “G2G” screenwriter, will discuss directing a feature film. The producer of “G2G”, David Shor, will outline a new model for film financing that promises to change the way Hollywood does business. Mike Blum, Disney veteran and technical supervisor of “Toy Story III” will be on a panel on animation.



Variety.com
Fest bows Barry's 'Guys'

Short Take

By ANNIE GARCELON

 
"Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys" will bow at the Tahoe/Reno Film Festival. The feature will screen on Aug. 25 outdoors in Sand Harbor under the stars. Fest runs Aug. 24-28.




Dave Barry turns Movie Star at Santa Barbara
February 9, 2005

Dave Barry Turns Movie Star at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival

Dave Barry The Santa Barbara International Film Festival has always been a bit adventurous with its selection of films. Along with the requisite slate of solid international and American independent features, the festival does a great job supporting local films and filmmakers.

This year, midway through the 20th edition, more than two thousand people packed the Arlington Theatre for the Centerpiece screening and World Premiere of “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys,” a fairly short movie written and directed by Santa Barbara resident Jeff Arch, the Academy Award-nominated screenwriter of “Sleepless in Seattle.” David Shor and Labrador Pictures, a Santa Barbara-based company, produced.

Arch based his screenplay on the fairly short book of the same name by Dave Barry, the Pulitzer Prize-winning humorist for the Miami Herald. Barry, whose syndicated column appears in more 700 newspapers, also turns movie star playing “The Guide,” essentially himself, with trademark Hawaiian shirt, bad haircut, and all.

Anyone familiar with Barry’s 25 or so books knows that you can jump in anywhere and find something to laugh about. Barry is a keen observer and superb chronicler of the human condition, albeit from the comic’s eye. By casting Barry as himself, the audience can see firsthand the kind of goofy persona that affects his writing and makes it such a joy to read.

Arch’s screenplay maintains a close relationship to the book, which is really a series of short chapters attempting to explain stereotypical male behavior, that is, “guy behavior,” throughout the ages.

The film, shot on digital video and set in Miami, revolves around Roger, the “Ultimate Guy,” played by comedy vet Lochlyn Munro. Munro’s toothy grins and vacuous stares are perfect foils for Elaine (Christina Moore) as we follow them from courtship to home ownership. A couple, Gene and Kelly, are the best friends, played by Khalil Kain and Megan Ward respectively.

In one scene that is particularly illustrative of a guy’s understanding of relationships, as they drive, Elaine tells Roger that they’ve been going together for six months. When Roger doesn’t immediately respond, Elaine imagines all sorts of relationship issues culminating with her rationalization that there is no knight, no horse. Roger, on the other hand realizes that at six months he’s way overdue for an oil change and that he’s probably screwed with the maintenance warranty as well. The next day, in a pick-up game of basketball with Gene, Roger asks if Elaine ever owned a horse. Meanwhile, Elaine and Kelly spend hours dissecting the conversation.

Arch’s storytelling relies heavily on sketch comedy. Sight gags are plentiful, as is a running gag about a favorite baseball player traded from the Marlins to the Yankees. In fact, since guys are drawn to sports like magnets, there are loads of sports related scenes including cameos by ESPN regulars Dick Vitale and Hank Goldberg. In what has to be great timing, 2005 Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Dan Marino teams up with Barry to “telestrate” protocol in the men’s room.

For a “desperate housewife” moment before there were desperate housewives, Elaine comes to terms with Roger’s inability to fix all things broken in their new home, and calls Steve, the super-suave fix-anything repairman played by the equally suave Carlos Ponce. Steve merely has to lay hands upon the afflicted appliance for it to be healed, endearing himself to all the women while the guys idly stand by.

John Cleese, another Santa Barbara resident, also stars and is over the top in Pythonesque way, playing four different medical experts who offer no real scientific explanations about guy behavior.

Dave Barry, Jeff Arch, John CleeseAfter the screening, Cleese joined Barry and Arch on stage for a short Q&A.

“I’m still not an actor as you can see from the movie,” said Barry. “I liked every part of it except the part where you have to go on camera and say certain words in a certain order—which turns out to be a really big deal to the director.”

Before heading off the after-party, Barry and Arch managed to dump the contents of their water bottles on each other much to the delight of the audience.

As Barry made his way through the crush of partygoers, posing for the occasional photo, the early buzz was mixed. A technical glitch in the sound system clearly bothered a lot of people as half the theater had to strain to hear and the other half had too much sound.
“The moment an audience has to sit forward, they stop laughing,” commented Cleese in the Q&A.

Santa Barbara filmgoers are among the most knowledgeable and discerning who attend film festivals. “Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys” will likely find its core audience among staunch Dave Barry fans that want to catch the master himself on screen, and of course, guys, who are—guys.

by James C. Davis
photos by Ray Mickshaw




Penelope's Peeps

Happy ending
Film Festival Comes to a Close
Text & Photos by Penelope Huston and Shannon Kelley Gould, with Matt Kettmann

Another night of festacular Santa Barbara fun began with the premiere of Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys–the Centerpiece film of this year’s festival. Locally produced by Labrador Pictures and based on the book of the same name, Guys played to a packed house and featured intermittent injections of comic genius from Montecito resident John Cleese.

I know plenty of guys, so I assumed I wouldn’t learn anything new from the recently retired columnist’s exposé. And while the segments "Guy Pride" and "Guy Sports Concerns" were less than revelatory, "Public Restroom Problem"–creatively illustrated by retired Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino–was enlightening. (An informal poll conducted at the after-party confirmed that eye contact in the bathroom is frowned upon, and a crowded urinal is a serious conundrum indeed.) The post-movie Q&A session with guy’s guy Dave Barry, director Jeff Arch, and the film’s co-star John Cleese ended when it descended into a water fight.

The party, held in the Arlington’s outdoor courtyard, took advantage of the starlit night, and the movie’s stars were in attendance, too. Given the testosterone-infused flavor of the flick, I halfway expected to find nothing to nosh but nachos; however, to my pleasant surprise, the spread–provided by Opal–was scrumptiously gourmet. The courtyard’s close quarters made for excellent mixing and mingling, and the sounds of Jason Campbell’s band had guests grooving to the beat. It was late when I left, although the festivities were still in full swing. But the week was young, my calendar was crammed, and my feet–though they looked fabulous in my very cute, very high heels, had had enough punishment for one night. I told my husband as much when I got home. "So why’d you wear them?" he asked. Such a guy. For more mid-week madness, here’s Miss Penelope …
–Shannon Kelley Gould





Fans line up for Guide's guy wisdom

2/3/05

By SCOTT STEEPLETON
NEWS-PRESS ASSISTANT METRO EDITOR

Jeff Arch, left, and Dave Barry at the red-carpet premiere of "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys."
Most newspaper columnists are not used to flashbulbs going off in their faces and fans vying for their attention.

Then there's Dave Barry.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist -- whose work has appeared in the News-Press and papers across the country -- was at the Arlington Theatre Wednesday night for the premiere of "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," an insider's guide to male foibles based on his best-selling book of the same name.

The red-carpet affair was all part of the 20th Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

The line of fans hoping to buy a ticket snaked down State Street from the theater and around the corner on Victoria Street. Mr. Barry, who wore a blue blazer over a fish-print shirt, was thrilled to see so many people.

"This is a wonderful turnout," he said before taking his seat in the Arlington.

Fans were equally thrilled to see him.

"Anybody who can get a Pulitzer Prize is my kind of guy," said Santa Barbara resident Susie Armstrong, who lined up with her friend Jennifer Pucci for tickets.

The film stars Mr. Barry as himself -- the Guide.

If you want to know why guys leave the toilet seat up, ask the Guide.

Ever wondered why they don't ask for directions? Turn to the Guide.

Why do they wear shorts in the rain? Only the Guide knows.

Mr. Barry is like radio talk show host Tom Leykis without the anger. From him, you get the primer on all those guy secrets and none of the incessant complaints about the ex-wives.

Before making her way into the theater, Christina Moore ("That '70s Show"), who plays Elaine, a woman trying to "get" her guy, said both men and women can learn from the film. "The movie really is the complete guide to girls because it's told from a girl's perspective."

Lochlyn Munro ("White Chicks," "Scary Movie"), who plays Elaine's squeeze, Roger, added: "We really are a different species. And my wife thinks so, too."

Local funny man John Cleese, who plays the film's four experts -- all of whom are essentially useless -- put his thumb and forefinger close together to joke that he just likes Mr. Barry's work a tiny bit. Then, in a more serious voice, he said he had been a fan for some time before landing the role.

"I have huge admiration for him," said Mr. Cleese, who arrived with his wife, author and psychotherapist Alyce Faye.

Santa Barbara resident Jeff Arch ("Sleepless in Seattle"), who wrote the screenplay and directed the film, said the red-carpet evening was an unforgettable way to end an unforgettable experience. "If this isn't a dream come true, I don't know what is."

Executive Producer David Shor added: "I couldn't be more thrilled. Look at this!"

It's too early to say how the film will do in wide release, but one thing is certain: Mr. Barry won't try to explain the fairer sex's ways any time soon.

"I don't think I'll do a complete guide to girls. That would be a very long movie. Longer than, like, 'Gone With the Wind.' "

e-mail: ssteepleton@newspress.com

STEVE MALONE / NEWS-PRESS PHOTOS






A Few Words on the Passing of Dave Barry's Column

By Steve Martin

Dave Barry is going on an "indefinite hiatus" only to attract attention to himself. Not famous enough, Dave? Why don't you go on hiatus! Oh, and make it indefinite. That'll grab some headlines.

Dave says he wants to spend more time with his family. But I hesitate to tell you that Dave's family is a hash pipe and some old Playboy magazines. Yes, Dave has written many funny essays that have appeared in our nation's newspapers. However, most of his material is plagiarized from his own mind. Often, a funny idea will come to Dave, and then he will use that idea in one of his columns. Also, he will sometimes have a perfectly legitimate sentence, and then twist that sentence all out of shape so it will read funny. Another device that he uses is the old trick of putting the punch line at the end of the sentence or paragraph. These tactics are abhorrent.

And, by the way, you know how he often says, "And I'm not making this up?" Well, he made that up.

Dave Barry, and I am not making this up, loves Satan.

Yes, he's really going on hiatus to give himself more time to worship Satan. When you think of all the Daves in the Bible, most of them are Satan worshipers. The snake, if you recall, was named Dave. And who is it who often takes a hiatus? Satan. Remember the movie, "Satan Takes a Hiatus"?

Also, Dave Barry plays in a band with Stephen King. Stephen King does not play music with people unless they're able to shine beams of light from their eyes that can set fire to wastebaskets. And I've seen Dave at dinner parties light people's cigarettes just by glaring at them, or sometimes he'll just reheat fondue.

But I will miss Dave. I'm going to miss every Sunday morning when I would run outside and get the paper and read his column and laugh out loud and feel sick with envy because he's so funny. Now I'm just going to have to settle for knowing that he's still there, in Florida, being funnier than all of us put together, but that the rat is keeping it to himself.




Allen pic set to open Santa Barbara fest

By Borys Kit
The 2005 Santa Barbara International Film Festival will open with a special preview of Woody Allen's "Melinda and Melinda," while the world premiere of "The Moguls" will close. The centerpiece presentation will be the world premiere of "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," directed by Santa Barbara resident Jeff Arch.

The 10-day festival, which will celebrate its 20th anniversary and runs Jan. 28-Feb. 6, will include 98 world premieres and 119 U.S. premieres. As previously announced, the fest will pay tribute to Kevin Bacon, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. New additions to the list are Annette Bening and David Attenborough.

"This year is thrilling -- we have reached the milestone of our 20th anniversary," festival director Roger Durling said. "To celebrate a festival that continues to grow by leaps and bounds each year, we have assembled our most ambitious program yet."

In "Melinda," the same love story is told alternately both comically and tragically. The film stars Chiwetel Ejiofor, Will Ferrell, Jonny Lee Miller and Amanda Peet. "Moguls," directed by Michael Traeger and starring Jeff Bridges, is a comedy about the citizens of a small town who come together to make an adult film. In "Guys," writer Barry takes on the topic of "guy-ness."

Panels at the festival will include "Movers and Shakers," focusing on producers, and "It Starts With the Script," featuring screenwriters and moderated by Frank Pierson, president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Other panels will include "Creative Forces: Women in the Biz"; "Directors on Directing," moderated by "Sunday Morning Shootout" host Peter Guber; and a composer panel "Scoring the Film," moderated by USC Radio host/film critic Jim Svejda.

A new addition to the panel lineup will be "Conversations With," a series of daily chats with indie actors. Moderating duties will be split between Durling and former New York Times critic Elvis Mitchell. Actors participating to date include Javier Bardem, Paul Giamatti and Laura Dern.



Variety.com
Posted: Sun., Jan. 2, 2005, 1:04pm PT

Woody pic goes west
Film fest kicks off with 'Melinda'

By ALICE M. WALTON
Woody Allen's new film "Melinda and Melinda" will kick off this year's Santa Barbara Film Festival. The love story, alternately portrayed as comedy and tragedy, stars Radha Mitchell, Will Ferrell, Jonny Lee Miller, Amanda Peet and Chloe Sevigny.

The 20th annual festival will showcase nine world and 11 U.S. preems during its Jan. 28-Feb. 6 run.

Nine-day fest will conclude with helmer Michael Traeger's "The Moguls," the story of a small town whose residents make an adult film.

World premiere of Santa Barbara helmer Jeff Arch's pic "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys" will be the festival's Centerpiece Presentation. Pic stars Santa Barbara residents John Cleese, Dan Marino and Barry.

Annette Bening has been added to the list of honorees at the festival. Bening, whose perf in "Being Julia" has earned her a Golden Globe nomination, will receive the Montecito Award.

David Attenborough will be feted with a tribute presentation and the newly created Attenborough Nature Filmmaker Award for his broadcast career, which includes "Life on Earth" and "The Life of Mammals."

New to this year's fest is "Conversations With," with a lineup of indie stars including Javier Bardem, Paul Giamatti and Laura Dern.

Festival also will host a number of panel discussions, including "Movers and Shakers," sponsored by Daily Variety; "It Starts With the Script," moderated by Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences prexy Frank Pierson; and "Creative Forces: Women in the Biz," hosted by Daily Variety's Madelyn Hammond.

"Directors on Directing" will be moderated by "Sunday Morning Shootout" co-host Peter Guber, and film critic Jim Svejda will host "Scoring the Film."

Date in print: Mon., Jan. 3, 2005, Los Angeles




'GUIDE TO GUYS' GONE WILD

10/16/04

By FRANK NELSON
NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

While filming "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," Mr. Barry, left, and John Cleese need little encouragement to ham it up for the cameras.
In the course of a few minutes Thursday, award-winning comedian John Cleese "grew" a Groucho Marx-type mustache and shortly afterward an impenetrable beard of Old testament proportions.

It was all part of the madcap fun that filmgoers can look forward to early next year with the release of "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys."

The film is based on the best-selling book of the same name by Miami humorist Dave Barry, whose weekly columns run in papers across the United States -- including the News-Press -- and overseas.

On Thursday, Labrador Pictures, a Santa Barbara-based company formed specifically to finance and produce this movie, was shooting the final few scenes involving Mr. Barry and Montecito resident Mr. Cleese.

During the day the scene shifted from Stella Mare's Restaurant, where Mr. Barry had to compete with a bevy of beautiful women, to the offices of Dr. Babji Mesipam, in Montecito's Upper Village, where Mr. Cleese displayed an expert grasp of scientific quackery.

And all the time, the quips and funny faces kept flowing, on and off camera. "These guys are just so funny and so easy to work with," said executive producer and Hope Ranch resident David Shor.

Mr. Cleese, complete with silly mustache, takes a last look at the script while director Jeff Arch, second left, and other members of the crew prepare to film the final scenes at the offices of Dr. Babji Mesipam in Montecito.
The film, known by its shortened title of "G2G," will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival on Feb. 2. Mr. Cleese and Mr. Barry are the first two stars to confirm they will be here for the event.

Mr. Shor said he hopes other major players from the film, including leads Lochlyn Munro and Christina Moore, along with legendary quarterback Dan Marino, will attend.

Mr. Shor's dozen or so investors have come up with roughly $2.4 million, which he said will be enough to complete filming and editing, plus add music, titles and special effects.

Labrador Pictures has yet to decide on the best means of distributing the film, and Mr. Shor expects the film festival appearance will boost the movie's market prospects.

He said though the company is open to approaches from major distributors, it may decide to fund a limited theatrical release itself or skip the cinema circuit and go straight to the DVD market.

STEVE MALONE / NEWS-PRESS PHOTOS





SHOOTING STARS

10/11/04

Scott Steepleton

*Shooting stars: "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys" is filming this week in Santa Barbara and Montecito.

Local funny man John Cleese is among the cast in this filmed version of the Pulitzer Prize winner's best-selling book. The film is being made by Santa Barbara-based Labrador Pictures, which is trying out a new model in financing movies -- letting the little guy invest.

In this case, a "little guy" is somebody who can drop $50,000 per unit.

Preferred investors, the ones who put their cash in early, could stand to make 110 percent return on investment, said David Shor, executive producer at Labrador.
"Assuming the movie does well, and we have every reason to believe it will, I've incented the investor so the investors are getting a coupon if you will, so they get the first 10 percent in," he said. That's on top of their original ante.

Investors can also go the nonpreferred route. "They're investing in the upside," Shor said. Namely, that the film's going to turn a profit.

These investors don't get the preferred coupon. "The way we figure it is, the first money in takes the highest risk," said Shor.

Ninety percent of the film was shot in Florida, where Barry writes for the Miami Herald. This week's shoots will take place at Lucky's, Stella Mare's, in San Roque and at Dr. Babji Mesipam's office in Montecito's Upper Village.

The film will premiere Feb. 2 at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival.



Variety.com

Posted: Sun., May 2, 2004, 3:57pm PT
 
Arch to guide 'Guy' pic
 
Scribe adapted from Barry's novel
 
By ADDIE MORFOOT

 
Screenwriter Jeff Arch will make his directorial debut with "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," a comedy that begins production Saturday in Miami.

Arch adapted the screenplay from Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Dave Barry's novel "The Guide to Guys." Story follows a couple for the dawn of time until the present in order to attempt to explain male behavior.

Cast includes Lochlyn Munro, Christina Moore, Megan Ward and Khalil Kain.

Arch, who received an Oscar nomination for "Sleepless in Seattle," and co-writer credit for "Iron Will" will work with Robert Schwartz, who will produce and David Shor, pic's exec producer.
 
Read the full article at:
http://www.variety.com/story.asp?l=story&a=VR1117904192&c=1236





Dave Barry
Posted on Sun, May. 30, 2004
Whose line is it anyway?

On the set of the film being made from his book, Dave decides to leave the acting to the professionals.

BY DAVE BARRY

I figured out why movie stars generally are young. It's not just because they look good naked. It's also because their brains still work.

I learned this recently when I became an ''actor'' in a movie being made in Miami based on a book I wrote, about guys. I put ''actor'' in quotation marks because real actors can, you know, act. Whereas my job in this movie was to walk into the scene where the real actors were acting, and say a line like: ``Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about!''

Sounds easy, right? You just walk in there and say one sentence! What kind of moron would have trouble with that?

An older moron. Me, for example. Oh, I'd memorize my line all right. I'd say it over and over, walking around the set like a deranged person, muttering to myself: ``Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about! Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about! Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about!''

After maybe 600 repetitions, I'd be ready to go. The problem was that the movie crew was never ready when I was. Movie crews are, basically, never ready to go. There's always a problem. Sometimes the light is too bright; sometimes it's too dark; sometimes a key actor develops a flagrant booger. It's always something. And on those rare occasions when everything is perfect and you're set to go, suddenly, out of nowhere, a guy will appear about 50 yards away and fire up a leaf blower. It seems to be the same guy every time, no matter where you go. You could be filming a scene on the North Pole, and just when the director said ''action,'' vroom, there'd be your leaf-blower guy.

The point is that there are endless delays on the movie set while the crew scurries around changing the lighting, wiping the booger, shooting tranquilizer darts at the leaf-blower guy, whatever. During these delays, I would strive to keep my line -- ''Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about!'' -- foremost in my brain. But mine is an older brain, already crammed to capacity with vital information, and soon other thoughts would start seeping, like sewer gas, into the forefront. For example, my brain would decide, for reasons of its own, that now -- right now, on the movie set, when I was about to do a scene -- would be an excellent time to review the song sung in Animal House by Otis Day and the Knights, Shama Lama Ding Dong.

So I'd be walking around, with my mouth muttering ''Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about! Now that's a good example of what I'm talking about!'' But my brain, in a loud brain voice, would be singing: ''You're SHAMA LAMA, my rama lama DING dong!'' over and over and over until this was all I could think about, and just then the director, Jeff Arch, would say ''action,'' and, with the camera and microphone pointed at me, and everybody watching me, I would say: ''Now that's an example of a good thing I am talking about!'' Or: ''I am talking about a good example of a thing now!'' Or: ''It's a good thing I have been talking now, about that example!'' And Jeff would say ''cut,'' and we'd have to do it again, and then again, until it became clear to everyone that, dialogue-wise, the scene would work better with just the leaf blower.

I did one scene with -- I swear I am not making this up -- a trained Chihuahua named ''Sidekick.'' I was supposed to pick Sidekick up off the ground, and, while walking toward the camera, say three sentences. Are you familiar with the old expression, ''He can't walk and talk and carry a trained Chihuahua at the same time''? That describes the situation perfectly. I'm holding this dog, walking forward, looking at the camera, sweat gushing from every quadrant of my armpits, and the boombox of my brain is going: ''You put the OOH MAU MAU, oh oh oh oh, back into my SMILE, child!'' So we did it over and over, me picking up this poor defenseless dog, apparently for the sole purpose of blowing my lines. I bet when Sidekick got home he really chewed out his agent.

Anyway, we finally got through it, even my scenes, and the movie (www.guidetoguys.com) is supposed to come out this winter. If you go see it, I hope you enjoy it. And if you notice that, at times, I appear to be distracted, that's a good example of what I'm talking about.




Variety.com

Posted: Sun., Jun. 6, 2004, 6:01pm PT
 
John Cleese

 
By JILL FEIWELLMICHAEL SCHNEIDER

 
John Cleese has signed on to co-star in the feature "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," an adaptation of columnist Dave Barry's novel of the same name.

Jeff Arch, who received an Oscar nomination for "Sleepless in Seattle," penned the Labrador Pictures project and will make his directorial debut with the film, currently lensing in Miami.

Story follows a couple from the dawn of time until the present in order to attempt to explain male behavior.

Cleese will play the role of the expert; Barry will narrate. Lochlyn Munro, Megan Ward, Christina Moore and Carlos Ponce star. Dan Marino, Dick Vitale and Hank Goldberg will make cameos.
 
Read the full article at:
http://www.variety.com/story.asp?l=story&a=VR1117906068&c=28





Low-budget film spurns Hollywood accounting

Firm exploring distribution options

7/11/04

By FRANK NELSON
NEWS-PRESS STAFF WRITER

Wearing hats that appear early in the film "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," director Jeff Arch, left, and executive producer David Shor, partners in Labrador Pictures.
Santa Barbara resident David Shor, drawing on his background in management, consulting and finance, is aiming to put the "business" back in show business.

"We've decided to change the mold," said Mr. Shor, executive producer for the fun flick "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys," most of which is already in the can.

Pulling together a group of investors under the umbrella of an SEC-compliant limited liability company called Labrador Pictures, Mr. Shor is pioneering an approach to movie funding.

He and nine other investors have ponied up $2 million, loose change in Hollywood but enough in this case to cover the main film shoot and postproduction editing. If a Los Angeles studio were making the same film, Mr. Shor guessed the cost would be somewhere between $20 million and $40 million.

"Those studios typically shoot half a page (of script) a day," he said. "We shot six pages some days. We were not burdened by the overheads of a studio. We were lean and mean and focused on efficiency and quality."

Qualifying as a shoestring production in moviemaking terms, Mr. Shor stressed there has been no compromise in quality as Labrador has worked to bring Dave Barry's mid-1990s best seller to the screen.

Jeff Arch, left, and executive producer David Shor, hope to combine making movies and making money.
The project tosses together a talented team of actors -- including Montecito's John Cleese -- and technical people under the eye of first-time director Jeff Arch. Mr. Arch, who penned the script for "Sleepless in Seattle," also wrote this screenplay.

Mr. Shor, who has been involved in film projects before, said in many cases a movie is very successful but at the end of the day, the investors are left wondering why they got little or nothing back.

The answer, he said, is "smoke and mirrors" -- a convoluted network of different companies that between them siphon off and disguise much of the profit. "I've watched the way they work and it's not a pretty sight."

He said motion pictures have traditionally been the most complicated of investments; that dubious track record meant it wasn't easy to attract investors despite having a new approach and a "great product."

LABRADOR PICTURES - From left, Robert Schwartz, David Shor, Jeff Arch and Dave Barry take a break from shooting "Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys" in Miami.
However, by tapping some of his prior business relationships, Mr. Shor found investors willing to buy units of $50,000 for a stake in Labrador Pictures, a single business entity that owns the book rights and the production process.

"These are people who traditionally look for interesting investments with good upside," Mr. Shor said. "This looks like, feels like and tastes like an ordinary business investment. It's something people could relate to and understand."

By holding tight to the financial reins, Labrador hopes for the best of both worlds -- retaining total artistic and production control and, if the film does well, carving up a substantial profit between fewer than a dozen well-rewarded investors.

Labrador Pictures, based out of an office at Mr. Shor's Hope Ranch house, was created last November with four partners: Mr. Shor and fellow Santa Barbara resident Mr. Arch, Mr. Barry and Robert Schwartz, the producer of "Guide to Guys," or "G2G," to use the movie's snappy nickname.

Mr. Shor said the team was lucky to hit consistently fine weather in Florida -- it didn't rain once while they were filming there -- allowing "Guide to Guys" to reach postproduction a little below budget.

Even so, he would like to raise between another $500,000 and $750,000 to cover postproduction costs and the remainder of filming.

Although roughly 80 percent of the picture was completed during three sun-drenched weeks in Miami, some scenes, including those starring Mr. Cleese, will be shot early October in Santa Barbara. A beachside cottage in Montecito will double as a studio for the final editing.

Between now and then, Labrador Pictures will have had to make some crucial decisions about distribution: Mr. Shor said the options are to distribute the film themselves or engage a major distributor. Or they could skip the movie release and go straight to DVD.

Mr. Shor estimated that it could cost around $1 million to self-release, which would likely mean rounding up a few more investors and issuing a second set of $50,000 units.

However, with a finished product to show and plenty of media buzz for the film, he's sure that money would be easier to raise than for the initial funding.

Mr. Shor took heart from the recent record of "Lost in Translation," which he said started with a limited release in just a few theaters and went on to great critical and financial success.

His mouth also starts watering when he looks at the phenomenal success of "The Blair Witch Project," which rocketed to fortune and cult status on a budget of less than $1 million.

Placing the finished movie in the hands of a giant distributor might help launch it onto hundreds of screens around the country, but that would mean carving off a big slice of the pie.

James Arnett, who has spent his life working in the movie industry, said Labrador is on the right track, though he doesn't agree it is necessarily breaking much new ground.

He described the business approach of building a limited liability company around a single film as "very standard," particularly in the case of independent, low-budget movies.

He also agreed that investing in films is very risky -- "investing in movies is the antithesis of a secure investment" -- but at the same time it can be "extremely lucrative," especially with a well-known actor onboard.

Mr. Arnett, now based in Tucson, Ariz., where his company is developing motion picture planning and production software, sees much sense in the way Labrador is going forward.

He said distribution is one of the key factors: If the product is good enough, it could spark a bidding war between distributors or go equally well if put out by the makers themselves so long as they have the marketing savvy.

Mr. Shor reckoned going straight to DVD could also make sense, especially, he said, because movies typically earn most of their money that way.

He's also encouraged by the popularity and high profile of Mr. Barry's writing here -- his column runs in the News-Press -- and overseas. "Dave has a huge following" he said. The "Guide to Guys" Web site is already getting 8,000 hits a week. "We have a built-in fan base."

That interest is coming from as far afield as Japan, the United Kingdom and Australia, all of which suggests to Mr. Shor that DVD sales and overseas markets might be a viable alternative to distribution in the United States.

If "Guide to Guys" is as successful as those involved are hoping, it may be only the first of several films Labrador will make. Inspired by results to date, Mr. Shor said the company is already considering three more Dave Barry books.




Dave Barry's 'Guys' guided to film

How do you turn Dave Barry's Complete Guide to guys into a movie? It's not a story; it's the Pulitzer Price-winning columnist's humor-filled book about male behavior stereotypes.

"That was the miracle of Jeff Arch," says Barry, shooting the movie in Miami now. Arch wrote Sleepless in Seatle and wrote the screenplay for and directs Guide. "He had read the book and had this idea to make it into a movie," says Barry. "I said, 'Oh, sure. There's no plot.'"

Barry says Arch used Elaine and Roger, two of Barry's characters, as the main elements to anchor his funny observations. "Weaving through it all is me - in the role of the narrator - who can't remember his lines."

"I'll walk in and say, 'Has this ever happened to you?'" he says. "It takes five hours to get that right."
-Ann Oldenburg




Posted on Wed, May. 26, 2004
Dave Barry film takes a look at guys' brains

Joan Fleischman/Talk of Our Town

A Hollywood, Calif., film crew is in town -- shooting Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys. Director is Jeff Arch, who wrote Sleepless in Seattle.

''Vignettes strung together by a guy and a girl,'' says Barry, 56, the Herald's Pulitzer prize-winning humorist. ``It allows women to look inside the brains of guys -- and discover that there is very little there.''

Barry plays the Guide. ``I'm sort of the narrator, and introduce a lot of scenes. Then I get out of the way so actual skilled actors can speak.''

The movie also stars other locals -- singer Carlos Ponce, former Dolphin Dan Marino, sports personality Hank Goldberg and John Kross, aka Footy of Y-100. Other cast members: Christina Moore (That '70s Show), Lochlyn Munro (Charmed) and sportscaster Dick Vitale.

Locations: Port of Miami-Dade, Smith & Wollensky, Miami Museum of Science & Planetarium, Omni Colonnade Hotel, University of Miami, WLRN studio, The Herald and Dinner Key Marina. They also filmed at the Pinecrest home of Manuel and Eida de la Fuente, whose sons Manny, 17, and Nicolas, 15, live in a ''bachelor pad'' apartment off the garage.

The movie, an indie with a $1.4 million production budget, is due out in early '05.




Montecito Journal
8 - 21 July 2004
Vol. 10 Issue 14

Coming and Going
by Thedim Fiste

Jeff ("It's Jeffrey when I'm in trouble") Arch wrote "Sleepless in Seatle" in January and February 1990. Jeff Says it took him all of three and a half weeks to write the first draft and at the point had never sold anything to anyone.

"Things like the making of the success of 'Sleepless' happens because somebody besides me believes in them," he says during a telephone conversation from his Montecito home recently. "It really was like 'Cupids Arrow'," he continues, "and hit a producer by the name of Gary Foster, who at the time had a deal with Tri-Star. Gary was persistant, got it to Mike Medavoy who ran the studio at the point; God bless Mike Medavoy. He said, 'Make the kid a deal,' and that's why I can talk to you about 'Guys.'"

Since 'Sleepless,' Jeff has done a rewrite for Disney ('Iron Will'), written a romantic comedy for CBS called 'Sealed With A Kiss,' and says he has "about fifteen other projects that are in various stages of not being made." The good news is that he just finished directing his first film: 'Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys,' based on the Dave Barry book of the same name. "We're in post-production; we're editting it now. It is actually a complete guide to guys," Jeff insists, though admitting that it's a comedy, at least he "hopes" it turns out to be a comedy. 'Guys' is a combination of fake documentary scenes with fake scientifiic experts, and fake people-on-the-street interviews, tied together with the story of a couple that is tracked from the dawn of time to the present, with a couple of periods of history inbetween.

Jeff met Dave barry at the Maui Writers' Conference in 1998 (see how this all ties in when you're paying attention?), when both were presenters. The two hit it off, and Jeff told Barry he thought his "Complete Guide to Guys" would make an incredible movie. "He told me I was crazy," Jeff admits. Dave Barry asked Jeff how he could do a movie without a story and Jeff quipped that, "They're always doing movies without stories. It's just that they think they have a story.' This time, we won't even think we have a story."

Frustrated with the Hollywood way of doing things, Jeff told Dave that if he would give him the rights to the book for free, he [Jeff] would write the screenplay for free. Jeff also to Dave that he'd find producing partners, raise the money, and produce the movie. "That way, we'd own it and not have studio interference or bankers and MBAs from Yale telling us what to do."

Cut to July 2004; two million dollars was raised and the movie has mostly been shot. Lochlyn Munro (he's in 'White Chicks') and Christina Moore ('The 70's Show') are the stars. Dave Barry plays himself as the guide; Dan Marino does a cameo. Dick Vitale from ESPN is also in it, as is John Cleese, whose scenes won't be shot until October, "because that's when he's available." Jeff Arch makes his directorial debut.

Jeff talked a little more about why he went the independent route, saying that "complete control" was important. "No one was going to hire me to do this; nobody was going to see that book as something that could be made into a movie," he explained. "All great things start out with a vision and they're usually a singular vision," he continued. "Whether this turns out to be one of those great things or not, it certainly has one of the qualities it takes, and that is singular vision.'"

The book has sold "a few hundred thousand copies," according to Jeff, who says that's enough to convince him "the material is good and solid." Jeff also admitted that he "really didn't want to spend five years running around to people who were going to tell me 'no' and be experts about why. I've had that. When I say fifteen movies that didn't get made, that means I was hired fifteen times by people who told me it was a slam dunk and then didn't come through."

Which seems odd, since Jeff Arch is a writer with a hugely successful film in his resume.

"I don't believe it either," Jeff says. "I'm going around with source material that is proven in the marketplace. Dave Barry is a brand name. I have that going for me. I had John Cleese, and we still had people saying, 'well, gee, I don't know.' So, the heck with that. We found our own money." He says they never even approached a studio, and that Santa Barbara-based Executive Producer David Shor not only helped raise the money but also helped to design and execute the business model.

Jeff Says that by mid-July, he'll have enough scenes "polished and ready" to show to distributors. "Already, we've gotten phone calls about it," he says, "Which is great... Now it's a known quantity. Six months ago it was an idea by a guy that had never directed a film. Not only did I direct it but I brought it in on time and under budget."

Since our telephone converstation, I've hooked Jeff up with Santa Barbara International Film Festival Artistic Director Roger Durling and the two are in talks now about premiering the film during next years film festival. To learn more goto: guidetoguys.com...




Dave Barry
Posted on Sun, Jul. 11, 2004
Take a walk on the wild side

BY DAVE BARRY

Pets are good, because they teach children important lessons about life, the main one being that, sooner or later, life kicks the bucket.

With me, it was sooner. When I was a boy, my dad, who worked in New York City, would periodically bring home a turtle in a little plastic tank that had a little plastic island with a little plastic palm tree, as is so often found in natural turtle habitats.

I was excited about having a pet, and I'd give the turtle a fun pet name like Scooter. But my excitement was not shared by Scooter, who, despite residing in a tropical paradise, never did anything except mope around. Actually, he didn't even mope around: He moped in one place without moving, or even blinking, for days on end, displaying basically the same vital signs as an ashtray. Eventually I would realize -- it wasn't easy to tell -- that Scooter had passed on to that Big Pond in the Sky, and I'd bury him in the garden, where he'd decompose and become food for the zucchini, which in turn would be eaten by my dad, who would in turn go to New York City, where, compelled by powerful instincts that even he did not understand, he would buy me another moping death turtle. And so the cycle of life would repeat.

I say all this to explain why I recently bought fish for my 4-year-old daughter, Sophie. My wife and I realized how badly she wanted an animal when she found a beetle on the patio and declared that it was a pet, named Marvin. She put Marvin into a Tupperware container, where, under Sophie's loving care and feeding, he thrived for maybe nine seconds before expiring like a little six-legged parking meter. Fortunately, we have a beetle-intensive patio, so, unbeknownst to Sophie, we were able to replace Marvin with a parade of stand-ins of various sizes (''Look! Marvin has grown bigger!'' ``Wow! Today Marvin has grown smaller!''). But it gets to be tedious, going out early every morning to wrangle patio beetles. So we decided to go with fish.

I had fish of my own, years ago, and it did not go well. They got some disease like Mongolian Fin Rot, which left them basically just little pooping torsos. But I figured that today, with all the technological advances we have such as cellular phones and ''digital'' things and carbohydrate-free toothpaste, modern fish would be more reliable.

So we got an aquarium and prepared it with special water and special gravel and special fake plants and a special scenic rock so the fish would be intellectually stimulated and get into a decent college. When everything was ready I went to the aquarium store to buy fish, my only criteria being that they should be (1) hardy digital fish; and (2) fish that looked a LOT like other fish, in case God forbid we had to Marvinize them.

This is when I discovered how complex fish society is. I'd point to some colorful fish and say, ''What about these?'' And the aquarium guy would say, ''Those are great fish, but they do get aggressive when they mate.'' And I'd say, ''Like, how aggressive?'' And he'd say, ``They'll kill all the other fish.''

This was a recurring theme. I'd point to some fish, and the aquarium guy would inform me that these fish could become aggressive if there were fewer than four of them, or an odd number of them, or it was a month containing the letter ''R,'' or they heard the song Who Let the Dogs Out. It turns out that an aquarium is a powder keg that can explode in deadly violence at any moment, just like the Middle East, or junior high school.

TRUE STORY: A friend of mine named David Shor told me that his kids had an aquarium containing a kind of fish called African cichlids, and one of them died. So David went to the aquarium store and picked out a replacement African cichlid, but the aquarium guy said he couldn't buy that one, and David asked why, and the guy said: ``Because that one is from a different lake.''

But getting back to my daughter's fish: After much thought, the aquarium guy was able to find me three totally pacifist fish -- Barney Fife fish, fish so nonviolent that, in the wild, worms routinely beat them up and steal their lunch money. I brought these home, and so far they have not killed each other or died in any way. Plus, Sophie LOVES them. So everything is working out beautifully. I hope it stays that way, because I hate zucchini.




Variety.com

Posted: Mon., Jul. 26, 2004, 10:00pm PT
 
Chicago's tunes have legit allure
 
Prod'n eyes regional theater opening next year
 
By PHIL GALLO

 
Add another band to the list of rockers going the tuner route -- Chicago.

The songs of the popular horn-based act are being adapted for "Colour My World," a classic "boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back" musical, according to producer Richard Akins. While a Broadway run is the eventual goal, Akins figures the musical will have two stops before getting to New York. Initial budget estimates for the production are $9 million-$11 million.

Screenwriter Jeff Arch ("Sleepless in Seattle") has been hired to write the book and Doug Katsaros ("Footloose") is the musical director. Akins is in discussions with Broadway producers with an eye toward opening at a regional theater next spring or summer. Akins expects the script to be finished next month.

Friendly with members of Chicago since he met trombonist James Pankow at a New Jersey concert in 1968, Akins planted the idea of a tuner with the band after seeing the success of Abba songfest "Mamma Mia!" and Billy Joel's "Movin' Out."

"Chicago has been writing a Broadway musical over the last 35 years," Akin said, recalling his pitch to the band.

Going by album and singles sales, Chicago is the second most popular American band in history, behind only the Beach Boys. The group landed 32 singles in the top 40 between 1970 and 1990 and is among only a handful of acts to have albums chart in five consecutive decades.

"Colour My World" will include at least two dozen of the band's hits, among them "25 or 6 to 4," "Hard to Say I'm Sorry," "Beginnings," "You're the Inspiration" and "Make Me Smile." Pankow has written two new songs for the tuner, one with guitarist Keith Howland.

Unlike other musicals based on a rock band's repertoire, some of the tunes will be done as instrumentals ("Saturday in the Park," for example) or in snippets.

Chicago keyboardist-songwriter Robert Lamm "asked me to make sure the book could stand alone," Akins said. "Once we had the story, we began to tie in the songs, which meant we didn't get in all my favorites or even all of the hits." Noticeably absent from the current lineup are "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" and "Feelin' Stronger Every Day."

Story concerns two fraternity brothers still in college. The wild one is destined for a career in the entertainment business; the more introspective student is an artist. The two realize their dreams at an early age and, post-college, come to find there's a void in their notions of success.

If the show makes it to Broadway, it will be Akins' first on the Great White Way. He has produced more than 70 national tours of shows, including the Bolshoi Ballet and Radio City spectaculars, and produced concerts at the now-shuttered Music Fairs in several East Coast cities. Akins is producing "Colour My World" with his wife, Janina.

Chicago remains a popular summertime concert attraction in the U.S. and is currently on a co-headlining bill with Earth, Wind & Fire.
 
Read the full article at:
http://www.variety.com/story.asp?l=story&a=VR1117908297&c=16




Jul 27, 2004

Baby, What a Big Surprise: Chicago to Hit Broadway with Colour My World


  
It has just been announced that the famous rock-and-roll band Chicago has signed with theatrical producers Richard and Janina Akins to develop Colour My World, a musical based on the group's hit songs. Plans are for the show to open on Broadway in the spring of 2005. Jeff Arch, who wrote the screenplay for Sleepless in Seattle and Broadway musical director Doug Katsaros are attached to the project.

According to Richard Akins, "Chicago represents an important part of musical history for millions of fans, their music itself is timeless, and the lyrics are full of the kind of imagery that lends itself to a classic Broadway show. It's a perfect fit, and that's why some of Broadway's best have come onboard already."






From USA Today:

Jazz/rock group Chicago is the latest band to take its work to a new stage. The Grammy-winning group has signed to develop the musical Colour My World, with plans for a premiere next spring. Writer Jeff Arch (Sleepless in Seattle) and musical director Doug Katsaros are working on the project, which will feature the group's horn-driven hits. Colour My World follows in the footsteps of ABBA's Mamma Mia! and a new production featuring the music of Queen that will open in Las Vegas in September.




From the Nov 30 Hollywood Reporter

Milly's' voice to be heard as CBS original

By Nellie Andreeva
The real-life story of political journalist Morton Kondracke and his activist wife Milly's struggle with her Parkinson's disease is coming to the screen as a CBS telefilm starring Bruce Greenwood and Madeleine Stowe.

"Saving Milly," based on Kondracke's best-selling book, will be co-produced by Magna Global Entertainment, marking CBS' first collaboration with the ad buying agency on a TV movie. It also will introduce to primetime viewers the Family Friendly Programming Forum, which is sponsoring the movie through members Johnson & Johnson, the Kellogg Co., Pfizer Consumer Healthcare and Unilever.

Emmy-winning director-producer Dan Curtis is on board to direct "Saving Milly" from a script by Oscar-nominated writer Jeff Arch ("Sleepless in Seattle"). Curtis also is executive producing the Dan Curtis/Dan Blatt Prods. film with Dan Blatt, David Kennedy and Magna Global's Frances Croke Page and Elaine Frontain Bryant.

"Saving Milly," which has started production in Vancouver, chronicles the relationship between Kondracke and his wife, which takes a dramatic turn in 1987 when she was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

"It's really a love story that is engaging, and it's about family pulling together after the awareness of a serious illness," said Bill Cella, chairman and CEO of Magna Global USA. "It's a terrific story, and it's a true story."

As a member of the executive council of the Family Friendly Programming Forum, Cella brought "Saving Milly" to the organization, a group of major advertisers who support the development of family-friendly TV fare. The project immediately received a thumbs up.

"Magna Global is proud to be able help bring this movie to live on behalf of the Family Friendly Programming Forum," said Cella, who believes sponsorship and other advertisers' involvement in the development process is getting more and more important. "I think it's an important part of the future of television. I think advertisers are looking to support very good content, to put their name on it and to be able to say that they've really helped bring a project to life. It can have a lot of meaningful communication channels to it."

Magna Global's TV movie producing experience includes the Johnson & Johnson presentations for TNT, most recently "The Wool Cap."

Greenwood's recent credits include the features "Being Julia" and "I, Robot" and the telefilm "The Riverman." His upcoming big-screen projects include "Racing Stripes," "Capote" and "The World's Fastest Indian." He is repped by the Gersh Agency and manager Chuck Binder.

Stowe's feature credits include "The Last of the Mohicans," "Twelve Monkeys" and "We Were Soldiers." She is repped by UTA.